The anti-fracking movement is one of the fastest growing community lead movements in this country. There are current over 100 local anti-fracking groups. This grassroots
movement has alarmed the unconventional oils and gas industry as they were hoping to start their drilling program with little to no opposition from local communities.

But it’s not just locally affected communities who are fighting against fracking. Cultural figures are joining local communities and activists to demand a sustainable energy future. This partnership was the backdrop to last month’s Fracked Future Carnival.

Frack Off London organized the event which was held outside the Shale Gas Forum. The forum was billed as an opportunity for the unconventional oil and gas companies to meet with government officials to find new ways to sell fracking to the British public and
discuss the viability of the industry in this country. Some of the key speakers included the CEOs of Cuadrilla and IGas – two companies that have exploratory drilling sites in the UK.

The theme of the carnival was Fracked Future and attendees were asked to dress either as a zombie, ghoul or anything that they felt reflected the environmentally devastated future society would face if it continued to pursue fossil fuels using destructive extraction techniques like fracking.

The event was originally scheduled to take place at the lavish Jumeriah Carlton Tower in Knightsbridge. However the location of the forum was changed at the last minute to the heavily militarised HAC Armoury in Shoreditch. The last minute venue change did not deter the carnival attendees who simply followed them to the new location. One clever protestor was even able to get inside the forum and obtain some of the presentation materials.

Outside the venue, there was music by dub step artist Jamie King, speeches by local activists Vanessa Vine and Tina Louise and fashion designer Vivienne Westwood. Fuel Poverty Action spoke about the connection between social justice issues like fuel poverty and the government dash for gas. Finally alternatives like the 1 Million Climate

Jobs campaign were presented by PCS Union. From the materials collected from inside the conference, it was clear that the industry
are very concerned that the frack-free movement is winning. They are seeking news ways to sell fracking to the British public but are fighting an uphill battle.

It’s important for this reason that we continue to show opposition to this industry at every chance possible. Their is no social license to drill by here in the country. More importantly, there are real and genuine solutions to our energy crisis but lack of political
will. Together we can continue to put pressure on politicians and the industry to stop their dash for gas.